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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions Through Summer 2014 (PDF) 

Course Descriptions Starting Fall 2014 (PDF)


LAW 9520: Accounting for Lawyers

Designed to equip the law student who has not previously taken an accounting course with the basic principles necessary to properly understand the materials taught in Corporations, Tax I, and other courses in which accounting and finance are relevant. The course includes reading and interpreting financial reports, generally accepted accounting principles, terminology and basic methods of bookkeeping, commonly used valuation techniques based upon both assets and income, investment analysis, evaluation of equity and debt as capitalization methods, and the basic principles and terminology of securities including stocks, bonds, futures, options and other debt instruments.

Typically offered as a 7 week class

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

1 Credit


LAW 9301: Administrative Law

State and federal agencies govern many aspects of public policy, business and economic regulations, social values, politics and regulatory compliance. Issues relating to banking, environmental protection, food and drug regulations and health care matters are especially important in Administrative Law. The course examines the rights, power and procedures of administrative agencies in investigation, rulemaking, adjudication, and informal actions.  The course raises student awareness regarding the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government in the creation, implementation, and review of public policy and agency action.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9580: Admiralty

Introduces maritime law, including admiralty jurisdiction and selected topics of maritime law such as maritime liens, injuries to seamen, general average, carriage of goods, salvage, collision, and limitation of liability.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9671: Advanced International Business Negotiation

Building on the basic negotiation principles introduced in Negotiation, this course will examine advanced concepts, skills, constraints and dynamics of the negotiation process in the context of international business transactions and dispute settlement. Designed to attract an international and interdisciplinary mix of students, it draws upon and incorporates key theoretical and pedagogical lessons from Hamline University School of Law's "Rethinking Negotiation Teaching" project. Students will receive an overview of legal and institutional principles that affect international business, examine and experience how worldviews shape negotiation as it unfolds and engage in a series of applied and coached activities that require translation of negotiation theory into practice. The course design enables students to gain experience in negotiating across national boundaries and to make effective use of emerging communication technologies through the use of highly interactive exercises and role plays. Special focus will be given to negotiation challenges that arise during the process of business formation, internal management, sales and transactions, joint ventures, and responding to internal and external disputes.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

4 Credits


LAW 9502: Advanced Legal Research

Advanced Legal Research is designed to develop a mastery of legal research skills beyond the level of the required Legal Research and Writing curriculum. Lawyers need to perform efficient and cost‑effective legal research in print and electronic sources. This course provides in‑depth examination of primary and secondary sources, including federal and state regulations, legislative history, international law, treaties, and foreign law. This course stresses collaborative student‑group presentations and written projects.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9621: Advanced Litigation Practice

Provides advanced in‑depth training in advocacy skills for each stage of litigation through lecture, discussion, demonstration, simulation and critique. Includes examination of expert witnesses and voir dire instructions. Considers both civil and criminal trials. Students individually complete a simulated bench trial and jury trial.

Prerequisites: Litigation Practice or Trial Advocacy

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9566: Agricultural Law

This offering presents an overview of the legal issues surrounding agricultural law with a special focus on government regulation. The course will analyze the purposes underlying government regulation and whether those goals are well served. The class will also discuss issues that attorneys face on a day‑to‑day basis. Topics will include production contracts, food safety, organics, business structures, pesticides, and marketing programs.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9905: American Legal System

This class is for LL.M. and foreign exchange students only and is specifically designed to acquaint these students with the American legal system. The course includes a significant legal research and writing component.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9541: Antitrust

Examines legal protection of the competitive system under the Sherman Act, Clayton Act, and related legislation, including monopoly power, horizontal and vertical restraints on competition, and related problems.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9562: Arbitration

Examines statutes, rules and treaties related to international, federal, and state arbitration. Topics may include commercial, insurance, sports, medical, and labor arbitration with role plays and simulations throughout the course. Taught as a skills course with limited enrollment. Students may not enroll in this class if they have previously completed the Arbitration Certificate Program.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9595: Arts and Entertainment Law

The course emphasizes an understanding of copyright, publicity rights, trademarks, finance, labor law, and First Amendment through an exploration of the industry structure and practice for music, film, theatre, arts, online and related industries. The course emphasizes deal‑making in the entertainment industry and helps students develop client‑counseling and problem‑solving skills using issues related to typical industry transactions and business planning.

Strongly recommended: Intellectual Property or Copyright Law

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9503: Banking Law

Financial institutions affect every aspect of the U.S. economy. This course covers the United States banking system, including bank charters, state and federal regulatory agencies, limits on bank powers and investments, how banks make money, enforcement actions against troubled financial institutions, "too big to fail," and systemic risk issues highlighted in the financial crisis. This course moves to the current cutting edge where financial institutions today compete to offer new products and services within a rapidly changing legal framework.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9504: Bankruptcy

This course covers bankruptcy law and debt collection, including straight liquidation and corporate reorganizations under federal bankruptcy provisions, as well as state debt collection remedies, such as executions, garnishment, and attachment.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9505: Business Planning

The course focuses on the role of the lawyer as an advisor to privately‑owned businesses and their owners. Case studies of different types of privately‑owned businesses and planning and drafting exercises are used to examine a broad range of structural planning issues and the practical and analytical challenges of the planning process, with emphasis on tax and business considerations, tax traps and pitfalls, and creative planning strategies. 

Recommended: Tax II and Securities Regulation

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9526: Business of Lawyering

The private practice of law is a business, and new lawyers‑‑in both small and large law firms alike‑‑must understand the law firm business model and operations in order to thrive. This course will introduce students to the elements of a successful law practice: choice of business entity, business and financial planning, billing and collection, space, staffing, technology, marketing and client relations. Special attention will be given to the challenge of starting a solo or small firm practice.

Every Year Course

2 Credits

LAW 9672: Challenging Conversations

Based on the book, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most, authored by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen, this course challenges students to master key communication and conflict processing skills. Negotiating when we are personally and emotionally involved is one of our greatest challenges. But is it possible not to be involved? Can we check our feelings at the door? Communication skills, like handling challenging conversations, allow negotiation to happen, and help us get back on track when things get stuck. The course focuses on two skills dimensions: internal skills – the ability to work with your thoughts and feelings before and during a conversation; and external skills – the things we need to say and do in a conversation to help it go better.

Mastering these skills offers the possibility of negotiation success even when your negotiating partners do not share your aspiration to collaborate. The course is constructed as an intensive workshop, including group discussion, simulations, and challenging conversations set in a wide variety of contexts.

J-Term or Summer Only Course

1 Credit

LAW 9586: Children and the Law

Considers issues faced by children in the legal system, particularly in custody, support, paternity, adoption, child neglect and abuse, and criminal proceedings, with attention to the role of lawyers and other professionals in the system.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9111: Civil Procedure I

Focuses on the civil judicial process and dispute resolution. Civil Procedure I includes a study of the constitutional and legislative grants of authority to the state and federal judicial systems, including questions of personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, notice required by due process of law, and venue.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9111B: Civil Procedure II

Continuation of Civil Procedure I. Studies additional aspects of the civil lawsuit, including pleadings, motions, discovery, trial, post‑trial motions, appeals, and finality of judgments.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9543: Civil Rights

Examines statutory and constitutional doctrine on discrimination, primarily that based on race, sex, and disability. Focuses on major areas of concern, such as housing, government contracts and benefits, transportation, public accommodations, education, and others (excluding employment).

Recommended: Constitutional Law I and II

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9628: Client Interviewing and Counseling

Students will develop skills of initial client interviewing, assessing client's goals, developing and evaluating alternative strategies for achieving those goals, helping clients make decisions, and other aspects of effective continuing client communication. Students will use video, demonstration, simulation, critique and personal reflection to build these skills.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9610: Clinic

Clinic courses give students the opportunity to develop valuable litigation, transactional, and alternative dispute resolution skills through hands‑on experience representing actual clients under the Minnesota Certified Student Practice Rule. Through this experience, students will apply essential lawyering skills, encounter ethical issues, and see and experience how law works in society from the point of view of low‑income clients. Students will work in collaboration with other clinic students, receiving individualized feedback from faculty supervisors, and develop the life‑long habit of self‑reflective lawyering. Clinic students are supervised by in‑house attorneys or adjunct faculty members who are experienced practitioners, and clinic cases and projects are chosen to maximize student interaction with clients and foster student control and responsibility for every aspect of representation.

Students are required to prepare for, attend, and participate in a classroom component that meets two hours each week and to complete 70 hours of case work.

Professional Responsibility is a prerequisite or concurrent requirement for all clinics.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9611: Clinic: Student Director

Student directors will work in one of the Hamline Clinics and handle their own client caseload, as well as provide supervision to and collaboration with new clinic enrollees. Student directors will not attend regular weekly clinic classes, but are instead expected to devote a minimum of 45 hours per credit to client representation and supervision/collaboration with other clinic students as assigned by the clinic supervisor. Only students who have successfully completed one of the clinics are eligible to enroll as a student director; enrollment is by invitation of the instructor upon advance application. Preference will ordinarily go to students who have not yet been a clinic director. With permission of the supervisor this course can be repeated once for credit. Students may enroll for 1, 2, or 3 credits with faculty approval.

Prerequisites: Professional Responsibility and one of Hamline's clinics.

1‑3 Credits


LAW 9313: Commercial Law: Payment Systems

This course studies the rights and liabilities arising from payment by credit card, debit card, checks and other negotiable instruments, wire transfers, and letters of credit. Each of these forms of payment is governed by different laws and regulations. The law of bank deposits and collections will also be addressed. Course coverage includes Uniform Commercial Code Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5, as well as the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, Check 21 Act, and related federal and state laws and regulations.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9315: Commercial Law: Sales and Leases of Goods

This course studies the formation, interpretation, performance and remedies available for breach of contracts for the sale and lease of goods, including e‑commerce and contracts for innovative products. The course focuses primarily on Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code and covers related federal statutes such as the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9314: Commercial Law: Secured Transactions

The primary focus of this course is on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and selected federal bankruptcy provisions. Coverage includes the law relating to borrowing money and securing the loan with personal property, widely used as a method of financing by business clients. Lenders must perfect and maintain their security interests or risk becoming unsecured and recovering little or nothing if bankruptcy results. 

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9545: Commercial Real Estate Transactions

This course covers lease negotiations, due diligence in a commercial real estate transaction, the use of title insurance, environmental provisions and other essential provisions of commercial real estate documents. Students work in groups to draft a reciprocal easement agreement and a complex purchase agreement, working through the practical negotiating problems involved in commercial lease provisions and warranties. 

Prerequisites: Property and Modern Real Estate Transactions (may be taken concurrently)

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9581: Comparative Law: Foreign Legal Systems and the American Lawyer

This course examines issues arising when a lawyer deals with foreign clients, foreign lawyers, or foreign law. It focuses on the differences in procedure, substance, and perspectives between the United States and other countries, revealing the many ways in which the United States legal system is different and assessing the importance of such differences. The course examines foreign legal institutions and identifies ways in which lawyers can better understand systems other than their own and develop strategies for dealing with the effects of diverse structures.

Students who have taken Foreign Legal Systems and the American Lawyer cannot receive credit for this course.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9736: Competition

Law school competition participation offers students the opportunity to develop and refine writing and speaking skills for up to two academic credits with the assistance of faculty members as well as members of the bench and bar. The law school competitions at Hamline consist of a series of inter‑mural competitions throughout the year, in which teams of Hamline students compete against students from other law schools. The appellate‑type competitions require presentation of written appellate briefs and oral appellate arguments at a meet at which each team is scored and critiqued on briefs and oral presentations by judges and lawyers from the community. The client counseling, mediation, negotiation, mock trial, and similar competitions require a demonstration of conversational and advocacy skills directed towards achievement of client interests; no brief is submitted for these events. Students may only earn credit for two competitions during their law school careers.

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

0‑2 Credits


LAW 9605: Compliance Skills: Auditing, Investigating, and Reporting

This course is designed to expose students to key legal and operational concepts in the health care compliance field. Students use knowledge gained in prior mandatory coursework and participate in simulation‑based projects that require them to perform audits, investigations, and reporting activities to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state laws. The course also includes a mentoring component that builds on the theory of experiential learning whereby students are paired with industry professionals effectively linking Hamline's strong academic/classroom environment with the real world of health care compliance.

Prerequisites: Health Care Compliance Institute

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9901: Conflict Resolution from Religious Traditions

As a religiously, politically, and culturally diverse society, the people of Israel are searching for both traditional and new methods for resolving disputes that arise among individuals and communities. This course will explore traditional dispute resolution methods such as the Beth Din, Christian and Muslim courts, and Palestinian silha; the ways in which the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim religious traditions have shaped dispute resolution values; some of the major conflicts which face Israeli society today and the ways in which modern dispute resolution methods have been adapted to the cultures within Israel to resolve these conflicts.

Optional additional independent study credit.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

0‑3 Credits


LAW 9507: Conflict of Laws

Given the variations in the content of 50 states' laws, as well as the differing legal regimes in a globalized world, lawyers need to be familiar with many legal principles. This course provides an overview of legal issues that arise when the facts underlying a dispute involve more than one state or country. It will explore legal principles that determine which state’s law will apply to a dispute in many contexts including torts, contracts, and property. It will also review principles of judicial jurisdiction and cover the effect of judgments in states other than the one where the judgment was initially rendered. The content of this course is tested on the Bar exam in a majority of states.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 91000: Consortium

The four Minnesota law schools have entered into a consortium arrangement that allows students at each school to enroll in classes at the other two schools if they are not offered at the home school in that academic year. Registration for consortium courses takes place at Hamline, and tuition charges are included in the Hamline tuition. Students register at their home school and will be notified by the registrar's office if they may attend the consortium class. This cooperative effort among the three law schools presents an exciting opportunity for students to take advantage of courses in each school's area of expertise. Students are allowed to earn no more than six consortium course credits during their law school career. Only grades of 2.0 on a 4.0 point scale, or its equivalent, or above, will receive credit into Hamline.

Every Year Course

0‑20 Credits


LAW 9101: Constitutional Law I

Introduces constitutional interpretation, including doctrines and competing philosophies, and the framework of state and federal government under the Constitution. It includes the historical background of the drafting and interpretation of the Constitution, the development of the Supreme Court as an institution, the powers of the three branches of the federal government and of the states, and the structure of the Constitution, all as interpreted by the Supreme Court.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9304: Constitutional Law II

Examines constitutional interpretation of the speech clause of the first amendment, the free exercise and establishment clauses of the first amendment, and the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9316: Consumer Transactions

This course studies the regulation of consumer transactions, including transactions involving credit, loans, debt collection, usury and common law doctrines that protect consumers, such as deceit and unconscionability doctrines. This course is recommended in addition to Commercial Law: Sales and Leases of Goods and Commercial Law: Secured Transactions for those students interested in a full treatment of both consumer and commercial transactions

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9121: Contracts I

Explores the enforceability of promises, including contract formation, consideration, promissory estoppel, unjust enrichment, and contract interpretation.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9121B: Contracts II

Continuation of Contracts I. Emphasis on contract defenses, performance, breach, excuse, and remedies.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9600: Copyright Law and Related Rights

If we are truly in the "Information Age," then individuals and businesses need to know how to protect their information. Copyright law provides one means of doing so. This course provides an in‑depth examination of the core principles of U.S. copyright law, including copyrightable subject matter, ownership, infringement, remedies, and defenses. It also explores related rights such as the Visual Art Rights Act of 1990, the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9522: Corporate Finance

Business decisions on corporate debt, excessive risk, equity issuance through IPOs or secondary offerings raise many issues for lawyers when advising clients on capital structure. Designed as an advanced course for students interested in learning more about the legal implications of corporate financial decisions, this course explores debt and equity financing options. Topics may include characteristics and rights of securities (equity and debt), valuation issues, divided policy and related corporate accounting problems, and trust indentures. 

Prerequisite: Corporations

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9311: Corporations

Introduces the legal and business issues pertaining to corporations, both closely‑held and publicly traded. Topics include corporate formation, structure and governance, as well as the rights and liabilities of management and shareholders.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9131: Criminal Law

Examines the functions of the criminal law as a means of social control, focusing on the process of crime creation and the elements of criminal liability‑the criminal act, the criminal state of mind, and the absence of a defense of justification or excuse. Legislative definition and grading of offenses, and policy considerations relevant to those processes are studied in the context of the Model Penal Code and other penal statutes. 

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9306: Criminal Procedure I

Studies the constitutional issues that arise in the administration of criminal justice, focusing specifically on problems connected with police investigation and other pretrial processes, as governed by the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighth amendments.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9552: Criminal Procedure II

Studies constitutional and other issues relating to the criminal trial, appeals, and collateral attacks on conviction.

Prerequisite: Criminal Procedure I

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9598: Cyber Skills and Dispute Resolution

Dispute resolution providers and disputing parties are turning to technology to help them resolve disputes. In this course, students will analyze how technology‑facilitated communication differs from face to face communication and will identify both the benefits and drawbacks of relying on audio, video, and text‑based technology. Students will resolve disputes using one or more online dispute resolution platforms such as Smartsettle, Cybersettle, and iCourthouse; and will compare and contrast those services with the services provided by traditional neutrals. Students also will learn how the European Union is expanding online dispute resolution systems; discuss how that decision will affect the United States; explore how avatars, robots, and artificial intelligence devices can be integrated into dispute resolution processes; and negotiate internationally with students at the University of Hong Kong using e‑mail, instant messaging, and live video.

Students who have taken Dispute Resolution Practices or ADR and Technology cannot receive credit for this course. 

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9126: Elder Law

This course examines the legal issues raised by our nation's growing elder population. Special attention is given to the housing and health care needs of the elderly; liability and advocacy issues; financing of elder care; life and estate planning; guardianship; conservatorship, advance directives and end‑of‑life decisions; and elder abuse and neglect.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9553: Employment Discrimination

Provides an in‑depth examination of federal and state fair employment laws, particularly Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; and the Minnesota Human Rights Act. The focus of the course is discrimination on account of race, color, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and age. Considers jurisdiction, administrative and judicial claims, proof and other litigation problems and the impact of the law on employment practices.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9560: Employment Law

Surveys the common law and selected state and federal statutory schemes that regulate the employment relationship in the United States. This course does not focus on the anti‑discrimination statutes such as Title VII or labor‑management relations statutes such as the National Labor Relations Act. The course explores how state court decisions have eroded the employment at will doctrine; employee hiring and discharge; federal and state fair labor standards acts; employee privacy rights; occupational safety and health acts; worker's compensation; and a variety of fringe benefit regulations.  

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9509: Environmental Law and Ecology

Introduces the law pertaining to environmental issues. Environmental problems are defined and alternative legal approaches for dealing with them are examined. Existing statutory efforts such as the National Environmental Policy Act are analyzed, as are regulatory schemes relating to environmental quality. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the scientific principles of ecology as they relate to environmental regulation.

Recommended: Administrative and Constitutional Law

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9510: Estate Planning and Tax

Deals with the federal and state tax consequences of gratuitous wealth transfers. In particular, it provides basic coverage of the taxes on gift, estate and generation‑skipping transfers and of the fundamentals of estate planning with emphasis on estates involving small business or farm assets.

Prerequisite: Wills & Trusts (may be taken concurrently)

Recommended: Tax I

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9307: Evidence

Examines common law rules and modern rule systems for admission and exclusion of real evidence and testimonial evidence. Emphasis is on relevancy, competence, opinions, impeachment, the hearsay rule with exceptions, privileges, judicial notice, and presumptions.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9650: Externship

Externships (formerly practicums) give students the opportunity to engage in legal work under the close supervision of practicing attorney or judge mentors. Placements are available in selected law offices, judicial chambers, government agencies, nonprofit organizations and other practice settings. Externships are taken for three credits, and each three‑credit externship combines 114 hours of field work performed on site at a legal setting; approximately 12 hours of classroom work with 8‑12 students usually taught by an adjunct professor experienced in the substantive area of the externship; and reflective writing in support of the externship learning that is supervised by a faculty member. Students may complete two externships during law school.

Extended externships (available for 6‑12 credits) are available in special circumstances for students who have located unique opportunities for supervised work that cannot be completed in the normal three‑credit time period. Each extended externship includes a two‑credit classroom component and field work equal to at least 50 hours for every credit awarded beyond the classroom component. Extended externships require advance approval by the faculty director of the externship program and may not be available every academic year. The externship director makes all final decisions regarding the appropriateness of the placement and corresponding credits. Students are allowed only one extended externship and cannot take more than 15 credits total of externship classes.

Professional Responsibility is a prerequisite or concurrent requirement for all externships, except judicial externships. Other prerequisites may be required for particular externship placements. 

Externships are graded pass/no pass.

Every Year Course

3‑12 Credits


LAW 9511: Family Law

Considers state regulation of family relationships. Focuses on non‑marital relationships, marriage, divorce, custody, child support, parents' rights, and procreative rights.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9326: Family Mediation

This course is a challenging high‑energy 40‑hour seminar in basic divorce mediation skills and practice development. Along with the basic content areas of divorce settlement‑‑property division, parenting, child and spousal support, divorce tax issues‑‑the course also addresses: the role of consultants and lawyers; conflict theory; psychological issues; power balancing; domestic abuse; drafting agreements; and mediation ethics. Although designed with the law student and family lawyer in mind, the course also is ideal training and specialization for therapists and other social service professionals. The instructor combines therapy techniques and family law practice that offers all students refined skills and new consumer‑oriented service products in the era of managed care. Experiential learning is emphasized with the opportunity for individual feedback from experienced coaches.

Students cannot receive credit for both Mediation and Family Mediation.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

0‑3 Credits


LAW 9512: Federal Courts

This course prepares students to work or practice in the federal courts by examining advanced constitutional and civil procedure issues related to the limited jurisdiction of such courts. The course revolves around two key themes: federalism and separation of powers. Additionally the course considers essential aspects of federal court procedure and practice. Topics covered may include congressional power over federal courts jurisdiction; the power of federal courts to make “federal common law”; means of enforcing federal laws against state and federal officers; doctrines of federal and state governmental immunity; Supreme Court review of state court judgments; and the law of federal habeas corpus. 

Recommended: Constitutional Law

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9590: Federal Indian Law

Covers law related to representation of tribes as well as representation of state and local governments or businesses that may do business with tribes. After briefly examining the history of Indian tribes in the United States, students will learn about the trust relationship between the United States and recognized Indian tribes, tribal property rights, and the complexities of determining the applicability of tribal, state, and federal jurisdiction within Indian lands. As time permits, tribal water rights, treaty hunting and fishing rights, and Indian gaming law will also be examined.  

Students who have taken Native American Law cannot receive credit for this course.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9305: Federal White Collar Crime: Prosecution and Defense

This course explores the investigation, prosecution and defense of fraud and economic crimes in federal court. It covers substantive areas of federal white collar criminal law, including mail and wire fraud, conspiracy, RICO, public corruption, money laundering, and obstruction of justice. Internal investigations and grand jury proceedings, including rights and privileges protecting witnesses and documentary evidence, are the focus of the second half of the course. Federal sentencing guidelines and practice are also studied. 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: Criminal Procedure I

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9425: Food and Drug Law

This course will focus on the regulation of food, drugs and medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Students will learn about the statutory framework involved with particular emphasis on the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Students will learn the FDA's interpretation and enforcement of its status and regulations and will gain insight into the FDA's decision‑making processes and policies.

Recommended: Administrative Law

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9604: Governance and Ethics in Health Care Compliance

This course focuses on the role of Boards of Directors in meeting health care challenges and the ethical dilemmas commonly faced by compliance officers. In addition to outlining governance structure and responsibilities, the course will review tax policy with respect to tax exemptions for charitable entities and detail how that tax exemption is conferred. Special attention is given to not‑for‑profit, as well as for‑profit entities and the unique ethical and governance issues presented by various organizational structures.

Prerequisites: Health Care Compliance Institute

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9701: Hamline Journal of Public Law & Policy ‑ Associate Editors

The Journal publishes significant public law articles. This experience provides an opportunity for law students to refine their writing and research skills while responding to the needs of the community. Requirements of membership/ criteria for credit: members must participate in 60 hours of research, drafting or production each semester. The faculty advisor authorizes credit based on his/her observations, evidence of specific work product, and recommendations of the board of editors. In no event may any staff member be awarded more than seven credits. All associate editors, with the exception of students who graduate in January and senior associates, must complete sufficient work to qualify for credit in both academic semesters in order to receive credit for either semester. Exceptions may be made for students on leave of absence. Students may register for only one publication course in the same academic year. Associate editors receive one credit per semester for a total of two credits per year, and senior associates receive one credit for each semester they complete sufficient work. 

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

1 Credit


LAW 9702: Hamline Journal of Public Law & Policy ‑ Board of Editors

The Journal publishes significant public law articles. This experience provides an opportunity for law students to refine their writing and research skills while responding to the needs of the community. Requirements of membership/ criteria for credit: members must participate in 60 hours of research, drafting or production each semester. The faculty advisor authorizes credit based on his/her observations, evidence of specific work product, and recommendations of the board of editors. Staff members may receive up to two credits per semester, but in no event more than seven credits may be awarded to any staff member. All members of the board of editors, with the exception of students who graduate in January, must complete sufficient work to qualify for credit in both academic semesters in order to receive credit for either semester. Students may register for only one publication course in the same academic year. Members of the board of editors receive two credits per semester, and one credit for the summer following election to the board.

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9606: Health Care Compliance Institute

This course introduces students to the most important legal and practical concepts in the health care compliance field. Specifically, students will develop an understanding of the laws and regulations encountered by compliance professionals in daily practice with specific attention paid to the federal regulatory infrastructure. Students will also explore key operational concepts including audits, investigations, enforcement and reporting requirements, billing and coding basics, along with employee and vendor issues. Students will test legal and operational concepts through simulation‑based projects and small group exercises, including drafting assignments and mock interviews.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9323: Health Law Organization and Finance

This course addresses the regulation, structure, and financing of the American health care system. It will focus on the cost and access issues which permeate health care. The class will examine how health care is funded through both private and public insurance, including Medicare and Medicaid. The obligations of hospitals and professionals to treat the uninsured will be reviewed, as well as the policy questions about addressing access to the large uninsured population. The course will also review the forms and structure of health care enterprises, with a focus on the creation and regulation of tax‑exempt organizations. The fraud and abuse laws, including the False Claims Act, the Anti‑Kickback law and STARK, will be reviewed both from the perspective of the compliance department and of the lawyer who must structure health care entities with these laws in mind. Finally, the course will review how the antitrust laws impact the structure and conduct of health care providers.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9322: Health Law: Quality of Care and Liability

This is an introductory course examining how the regulatory and legal systems approach quality of care. The focus will be on mechanisms for assuring quality of care including self regulation, credentialing, the doctor‑patient relationship, professional licensure, government regulation, and the tort system. Examination of the tort system will focus on confidentiality obligations (including HIPAA), informed consent, and hospital and managed care liability. The course will review the role of ERISA in both managed care liability and health plan regulation. Finally, the course will provide an overview of how the public health system operates to protect both our health care and our civil rights. At the end of the course, students will have examined both the law and policy issues such as the problems arising from medical errors and the struggle to balance the need for quality against rising costs and lack of health care access. The curriculum focuses on cases applying administrative and common law, as well as a variety of statutory schemes.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9599: Immigration

Provides a survey of the cases, statutes, and procedures in immigration and nationality law. It is designed both for students who wish to practice immigration law, as well as those who wish to study the intersection of immigration law with criminal, employment, public benefits, and family law. The course will cover visa processing, family and employment based immigration, exclusion, deportation, asylum, refugee status, employer sanctions, administrative appeals, and judicial review. 

Recommended: Constitutional Law II and Administrative Law

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9720: Independent Study

The Independent Study offers students the opportunity to explore a specific legal topic under the supervision of a full‑time faculty member. The work will involve the production of a significant research paper or comparable project.

A student may take only two independent study courses.

Every Year Course

1‑3 Credits


LAW 9513: Insurance

Considers principles governing the making, interpretation and regulation of various types of insurance contracts, and methods of resolution of insurance disputes.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9592: Intellectual Property

This course provides an overview of intellectual property and unfair competition law by examining relevant common law principles and state and federal statutes. The substantive provisions of the laws governing trademark, copyrights, trade secrets and patents are explored in detail.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9555: International Business Transactions

Examines international business issues involving the export sale of goods; letters of credit in financing export sales; and resolution of international commercial disputes, including alternative forms and enforcement of judgments, tariffs on the importation of goods, customs classification and valuation, antidumping and countervailing duties, national restrictions on the export of goods and technology, and international transfer of technology. Also covers franchising and agreements for the transfer of "know‑how", foreign direct investment in developed and developing countries, doing business in the European Economic Community, and with non‑market economics.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9327: International Commercial Arbitration: Theory and Practice

The aim of this course is two‑fold: first to provide groundwork theory in relation to arbitration and second, to work with students and assist them in developing advocacy skills. The course uses an interactive workshop format and it is divided into two closely interrelated modules. 

The first module will provide students with the necessary doctrinal background in relation to key arbitration topics, such as validity and interpretation of arbitration agreements, the notion of arbitrability, the importance of the place of arbitration, the role and mandate of arbitrators, the challenge and enforcement of arbitral awards. It also looks into procedural issues that frequently arise in arbitration hearings. Here students will learn how to challenge the jurisdiction of an arbitral tribunal; whether it is best to challenge the tribunal's jurisdiction before a national court or the tribunal itself; how to request interim relief/injunction to support and protect their arbitral claims; how to bring a third party before a tribunal by joinder or how to bring more claims against the same party. 

All these topics will be discussed by reference to arbitration case studies. Thus, during this module, students will have to consider the factual and legal issues of three Arbitration Cases which will then be used for the "Mock Arbitration" sessions in the second module. 

In the second module, students will focus on advocacy in arbitral proceeding. Topics include techniques to develop a winning theory of the case, the art of the opening statement, effective presentation of documentary evidence, the use of experts, cross examination, and overall interaction with the tribunal and opposing counsel. This module takes the form of three "Mock Arbitrations" where students will have to apply the arbitration and advocacy theory of the previous sessions before a panel of experienced arbitrators. 

It should be noted that the course takes a international and comparative approach, looking into arbitration rules of the most well known institutions (such as the ICC and LCIA), as well as the arbitration laws of major national jurisdictions (such as England, France and Switzerland).

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

2 Credits


LAW 9597: International Human Rights Law

This course studies the policy, principles, and enforcement mechanisms for protection of human rights under contemporary international human rights law within the framework of the United Nations and the regional systems of Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Topics include the way international human rights law functions within the domestic law of the United States. Current problems in human rights protection provide the context for study.

Recommended: Constitutional Law I, International Law

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9518: International Law

International Law provides a foundation for what an American lawyer should know about international law and cultural differences in an era of rapid globalization. It introduces the international legal system's nature, major principles, and institutions, the relationship between international and domestic law, and the role of law in promoting world public order. It will examine jurisdiction, the jurisprudential underpinnings of law, treaty making and effect, recognition of states and governments, nationality of persons and corporations, and international legal dispute resolution. The course will bring these foundational principles together to see how the international legal system attempts to address international problems such as sovereignty over resources, protection of human rights, and the use of force. Finally, the course prepares the student for upper level courses with a transnational focus.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9593: International Litigation in United States Courts

Globalization has increased the importance of cross‑border litigation concerning a broad range of concerns, including business disputes, tort claims, human rights cases, and government regulatory actions. United States courts have developed a distinct approach to the resolution of such international disputes. This course focuses on the exceptional issues created by international litigation, including extraterritorial application of U.S. laws, service of process, discovery, enforcing foreign judgments, the act of state doctrine, foreign sovereign immunity, the Alien Tort Statute, personal jurisdiction over foreign defendants, forum non conveniens, and forum selection clauses.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9328: International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement

The legal environment for international trade and foreign investment has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. International trade and investment dispute resolution, in particular through international arbitration and other non‑judicial dispute settlement mechanisms, has become increasingly common. Foreign investors are much more willing to pursue claims against host State, (e.g., for alleged expropriation or discriminatory behaviour). Further, public international law principles must also be considered once a state is involved. Principles will be addressed such as state responsibility, expropriation and acts tantamount to expropriation, what comprises fair and just compensation, immunity from suit and immunity from execution. These public international law principles overlap somewhat uncomfortably with the commercial interests of foreign investors. Developments in investment arbitration and trade dispute resolution have been rapid in recent years. It is now crucial that academics and legal practitioners be aware of the complex international legal elements involved in the resolution of investment and trade disputes. 

This is unique course combining International Trade and International Investment Treaty Disputes and is attractive to students interested in public international law and international arbitration. Teaching will vary between interactive lectures encouraging student participation, traditional lectures, case studies, and seminars. Student presentations may also be required.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

2 Credits


LAW 9329: Introduction to U.S. Arbitration Law: Domestic and International Aspects

The foundation course covers the fundamental principles and themes of U.S. arbitration law. The course begins with a thorough introduction to the history and operation of arbitration including its constituent concepts and basic institutions, as well as customary practices. The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), the governing U.S. statute on arbitration, is covered extensively along with the impact of contract freedom upon the elaboration of an American law of arbitration. In addition, the Uniform Arbitration Law for states also is assessed. Several class sessions address the development of a doctrine of limited subject matter inarbitrability and the growth of arbitrator sovereignty as to jurisdiction, the conduct of proceedings, and the determination of the merits. Finally, problems relating to the enforcement of arbitral awards and other practical issues are addressed. The course includes a number of break‑out sessions and a workshop component on drafting arbitration agreements.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

2 Credits

 

LAW 9556: Jurisprudence

Examines fundamental philosophical problems that arise from the creation of legal and political institutions. Application of various jurisprudential theories to current legal problems is studied.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9514: Labor Law

Labor unions exercise significant influence not only in the business world, but also in the political arena. Why have unions had such power, what are the limits on this power, and how can employers respond to unions' concerted activities? This course identifies the specific protections provided by the National Labor Relations Act and also examines the reasons why those protections exist. The duty of both the employer and the union to bargain collectively in good faith will be explored. The primary focus will be on private sector labor relations, but public sector labor issues, such as whether public sector employees have the right to strike and the right to collectively bargain, also will be discussed. 

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9515: Land Use Planning

Covers various private and public controls and powers utilized in the development of land. Attention is given to restrictive covenants, easements, zoning, subdivision regulations, public acquisition of land, and urban planning.

Prerequisite: Property

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9711: Law Review ‑ Associate Editors

Law Review staff may receive up to one credit per academic semester for Law Review participation. Credit is awarded after review of their work by the Law Review faculty advisor. All Law Review associates, with the exception of third‑year students who graduate in January, must complete sufficient work to qualify for credit for both academic semesters in order to receive credit for either semester. Exceptions may be made for students on leave of absence from the law school for a semester. Students may participate for credit on only one publication per academic year. Members of the board of editors receive two credits per semester, and associate editors receive two credits per year.

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

1 Credit


LAW 9712: Law Review ‑ Board of Editors

Law Review staff may receive up to one credit per academic semester for Law Review participation. Credit is awarded after review of their work by the Law Review faculty advisor. All Law Review associates, with the exception of third‑year students who graduate in January, must complete sufficient work to qualify for credit for both academic semesters in order to receive credit for either semester. Exceptions may be made for students on leave of absence from the law school for a semester. Students may participate for credit on only one publication per academic year. Members of the board of editors receive two credits per semester, and associate editors receive two credits per year.

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

1 or 2 Credits


LAW 9558: Law and Bioethics

This course covers constitutional and statutory rights of patients, as well as ethical and policy concerns in the area of medical treatment, including confidentiality, informed consent, right to treatment, and bioethical concerns involving matters such as emerging reproductive, transplant and life support technologies.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9585: Law of Juvenile Delinquency

Study of the history and philosophy of the law of juvenile delinquency, and functioning of the juvenile court including jurisdiction, intake and hearing procedures, dispositions, the role of counsel and other professionals in the system, and constitutional limitations.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9567: Legal Drafting

This skills course involves the drafting of legal documents. Legal disputes often arise because of poorly‑drafted documents, and this class will focus on drafting tips and strategies that optimize planning, risk prevention, creative problem‑solving, and excellent writing. Because legal drafting is an important skill in many different substantive areas, this course will vary in content over time and may include topics such as contracts, wills and trusts, pleadings, and settlement agreements.

Student cannot exceed 4 total credits in Legal Drafting

Every Other Year Course

1 or 2 Credits


LAW 9168: Legal Research and Writing I

Teaches legal analysis, the synthesis of legal authorities, and the writing of objective legal memoranda. Introduces legal research concepts, legal citation, and transactional drafting. Weekly class meetings are supplemented by extensive written and oral individual feedback on drafts and completed assignments.

Required Course

2 Credits


LAW 9169: Legal Research and Writing II

Continuation of Legal Research and Writing I. Teaches written and oral client communications, trial‑level persuasive memoranda, and the drafting of documents for related transactions. Teaches primary and secondary source research skills, cost‑effective research, and citation through weekly hands‑on exercises. Introduces oral advocacy. The allocation of subject matter between Legal Research and Writing I & II may vary from year to year.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9170: Legal Research and Writing III: General Practice and Transactional

Continuation of Legal Research and Writing I and II.  Students will learn general and specific drafting concepts; draft transactional, estate planning, and other documents; engage in simulated practice activities; and learn how to research, evaluate, and use a variety of practice materials. Classes will include both lectures and significant experiential learning through small‑group exercises.

Students cannot earn credit in both Legal Research and Writing III: Litigation and Legal Research and Writing III: General Practice and Transactional

Required Course

2 Credits


LAW 9171: Legal Research and Writing III: Litigation

Continuation of Legal Research and Writing I and II. Students will draft an appellate brief and related assignments; present an appellate oral argument; work on a variety of professional communication and presentation skills, both written and oral; and expand their research skills.  Classes will include both lectures and significant experiential learning through small‑group exercises. 

Students cannot earn credit in both Legal Research and Writing III: Litigation and Legal Research and Writing III: General Practice and Transactional

Required Course

2 Credits


LAW 9163: Legal Research and Writing Teaching Assistant

Legal Research and Writing Teaching Assistants will assist with teaching a variety of skills to first‑year Legal Research and Writing students. Each teaching assistant will be assigned to work with one Legal Research and Writing Instructor. Depending on the instructor and on the teaching assistant's qualifications and interests, teaching assistants will engage in a variety of tasks, including helping to develop research and writing assignments, participating in classroom teaching, holding office hours to assist first‑year students, grading research and other exercises submitted by first‑year students, checking citations on submitted assignments, and keeping student records.

Teaching assistants must also attend regular training sessions, which will cover teaching skills; research, citation, and other skills to be taught to the first‑year students; and administrative issues and concerns.  

Graded Pass/No Pass

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9516: Legislation

Study of statutes and legislative materials as they are used in litigation. Emphasis is on the interpretation of statutes by courts and the use of extrinsic aids in determining legislative intent.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9623: Mediation

Through discussion, simulations, and role‑play, this course focuses on the structure and goals of the mediation process and the skills and techniques mediators use to aid parties in overcoming barriers to dispute resolution. The course also examines the underlying negotiation orientations and strategies that mediators may confront and employ, the roles of attorneys and clients, dealing with difficult people and power imbalances, cultural considerations, and ethical issues for lawyers and mediators. In addition, special attention is devoted to the art of successful representation of clients in mediation. This course will meet the requirements of the Minnesota Supreme Court to be included on the Court's Roster of Qualified Neutrals.

Students may not enroll in this class if they have completed Mediation and Other Methods to Promote Democratic Dialogue (Budapest Study Abroad Program).

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9330: Mediation and Other Methods to Foster Democratic Dialogue

Through lecture, discussion, demonstration, and role play, students are introduced to mediation models and scenarios from both the United States and Central and Eastern Europe. The task of translating hostile and adversarial communication into building blocks of collaborative dialogue will be explored, as well as the mediator's role in identifying, framing, and ordering the issues in dispute. Analysis will highlight the persuasive techniques for moving parties from impasse to settlement. Special attention will be directed to the ethical dilemmas faced by mediators, particularly challenges to a mediator's impartiality, and the potential for abuse of discretion and power. The course also will examine a variety of strategies to foster and support democratic and constructive dialogue, particularly focusing on "high‑conflict" situations involving inter‑ethnic tensions. Students will study efforts in Central and Eastern Europe to promote meaningful democratic dialogue in times of national and international crisis. Participants should come prepared for a highly interactive learning experience. For each of six consecutive years, students and faculty from over 20 countries have participated in the program, making it an unparalleled cross‑cultural learning experience.  

Students may not enroll in this course if they have taken Mediation or Family Mediation.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

3 Credits


LAW 9559: Medical Malpractice: Theory and Practice

Introduces the law of medical malpractice, combining review of substantive law with simulation exercises from discovery to the trial of a malpractice case. Subject areas include tort and contract theories of liability, informed consent and right to treatment, procedural and evidentiary aspects of malpractice claims including expert testimony and scientific evidence, and defenses including indemnity and contribution and comparative fault.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9517: Modern Real Estate Transactions

This course covers the essentials of residential and commercial real estate transactions. Topics may include contracts, mortgages, condominium ownership, purchase agreements and real estate title issues.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Prerequisite: Property

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9570: Negotiation

This course examines the skills, constraints, and dynamics of the negotiation process. A theoretical framework for understanding negotiation practice in a variety of contexts will be developed through readings and highly interactive exercises and role‑plays. The course addresses the fundamental skills of systematic and thorough negotiation preparation, the ongoing management of a negotiation process, and the identification and achievement of optimal agreements. Legal and ethical constraints of negotiation also are considered. Course content is drawn from the fields of law, psychology, business, and communication.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9331: Negotiation and International Organizations

This alternative dispute resolution course examines international organizations, devotes special attention to Norway's role as an international neutral, explores cross‑cultural negotiation, and provides students with the opportunity to negotiate directly with other students. Whenever possible, students from other countries participate in the negotiation exercises. This simulation experience allows students to confront cultural differences and address alternative negotiating techniques and styles.

Students may not enroll in this course if they have taken Negotiation or Negotiating International Business Transactions.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

2 Credits


LAW 9423: Nonprofit Organizations

The world of nonprofit organizations includes charities, universities, hospitals, and foundations. This course examines the historical and public policy bases underlying tax‑exempt status, as well as the rules governing the entities' formation and operation. Topics will include the fiduciary duties of nonprofit directors, and the liability of nonprofit entities, directors, and volunteers to third parties.

Recommended: Tax I: Tax of Individuals

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9900: Norwegian Law and Legal System

This program offers students the opportunity to broaden their understanding of the American and Norwegian legal systems and allows students to study comparative law and international diplomacy in the setting of another country's legal system. The cultural setting and the contacts with legal scholars and practitioners create a unique educational opportunity for law students. While in Bergen and Oslo, students learn about the Nordic origins of law and discover a country whose people are known for their pioneering spirit and progressive attitudes toward social issues. Students visit a variety of state institutions and meet with members of the courts and parliament, practicing attorneys, police and prison officials.

J‑Term or Summer Only Course

1‑4 Credits


LAW 9594: Patent Law

This course will focus on an advanced and in‑depth investigation of patent law including the requirements of patentability, the patentability of various traditional and nontraditional subject matters (e.g., computer software and biotechnology), the process of securing patent protection including the procedures of the U.S. Patent Office as well as post allowance procedures, licensing of patents, and issues confronting the patentee and an alleged infringer including the burdens and presumptions surrounding patent validity, the standard for infringement, and available remedies.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9172: Practice, Problem‑Solving and Professionalism

Lawyers assume many leadership roles as professionals in today's society, all of them grounded in problem solving: advocate, counselor, negotiator, transactional architect, and many others. This course will foster an understanding of the lawyer's role as a problem solving professional and provide an overview of the range of dispute resolution processes lawyers use to resolve client problems, such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration. Law students will be introduced to the key skills of effective communication and negotiation and will explore the breadth of career possibilities available for lawyers. Student learning will be enriched throughout the course using a variety of experiential strategies to promote practical skill development.

Required Course

2 Credits


LAW 9627: Pretrial Skills

Focusing on the lawyer's role in discovery and fact development, students will learn pretrial skills. Students will create a discovery plan and manage the discovery process; take and defend depositions; draft and respond to written discovery requests, including interrogatories and document requests; draft discovery deficiency letters; and prepare motions to compel. Students will use video, demonstration, simulation, critique and personal reflection to build these skills.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9211: Professional Responsibility

An in‑depth study of the American Bar Association Model Code of Professional Responsibility, the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and the Canons of Judicial Ethics. Emphasizes the impact of these rules on the practice of law and procedures available for the improvement of the legal profession. The Model Code and Model Rules is compared to the actual rules adopted by the states and coverage of trust accounts is also included.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

2 Credits


LAW 9142: Property

Study of the concept of real and personal property in our legal system. Real property is emphasized, with the primary focus on estates in land from an historical and modern perspective. Future interests and landlord tenant problems are considered. 

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9572: Public Health Law and Ethics

This course addresses governmental powers, duties, and limits as regards the health of the American population. It emphasizes the relationship between individual interests and population‑level or governmental interests and focuses on the legal, policy, and ethical questions that arise when the state intervenes to protect the population's health. The course will include topics such as privacy and surveillance, vaccination, quarantine and isolation, screening and compulsory treatment, health communication, public health research, and the control of chronic diseases.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9308: Remedies

Studies remedies at law and in equity with emphasis on specific performance, restitution, injunction, and damages and explores the interrelation of civil procedure, contracts, and torts.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9530: Restorative Justice: Practices & Principles

This course offers students an opportunity to study the four leading Restorative Justice practices: (1) Talking Circles; (2) Victim‑Offender Mediation; (3) Family Group Conferencing; and (4) Truth Commissions. The course will examine the principles underlying these Restorative Justice practices and explore the possibilities Restorative Justice offers to move beyond the limits of a retributive sense of justice toward embracing the importance of forgiveness, reconciliations, and social healing in the community. Application of Restorative principles and practices to disputes rooted in ethnic and cultural conflict in the United States will receive extended attention during the last third of the course. The class will be intensively experiential in nature with the practice of the talking circle serving as a core modality for class discussion. Due to the course's highly experiential nature, enrollment is strictly limited to 24 students. There is no prerequisite for this course.

Every Other Year Course

2 or 3 Credits


LAW 9519: Securities Regulation

Business lawyers must understand the scope of securities laws in advising clients on compliance with regulatory requirements. The course focuses primarily on the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and state “blue sky” laws and covers registration requirements, exempt securities and transactions, reporting and disclosure requirements, IPOs and secondary offerings, insider trading, and enforcement. 

Prerequisite: Corporations

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9450: Selected Topic

General Course Description of Selected Topics

Educates students to practice in emerging and specialized areas of law not covered by advanced courses in the curriculum. Topics covered differ from semester to semester; course descriptions for each topic area are approved by the associate dean for academic affairs. Students may take more than one Selected Topics course in their law school career as space permits. 

Selected Topics courses do not satisfy the seminar requirement for graduation

Every Year Course

0‑4 Credits


LAW 9400: Seminar

A seminar is a rigorous writing experience requiring the production of a substantial research paper. Each student will complete at least one well‑developed draft, which the professor will critique extensively. Each student will rewrite the draft(s) based on the faculty member's assessments.

Enrollment in the seminar class cannot exceed 16 students.

A student may take more than one seminar, but students who have not yet had a seminar have priority.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9320: Sexual Orientation Law

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of the legal issues relating to sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender identity. It examines laws relating to discrimination, family matters, marriage, the military, education and privacy.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9561: Social Welfare Law

Examines government benefit and social services programs, such as Social Security, welfare, unemployment, housing, and health programs. Focuses on comparison of government policies and recipient rights in these programs. 

Prerequisites: Constitutional Law I

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9424: Sports Law

Sports occupy a unique place in modern society; they are significant both economically and as a form of cultural expression. This course surveys the regulatory framework surrounding professional and amateur sports, and reaches a broad range of substantive legal areas, including contracts law, labor law, antitrust law, torts law, and intellectual property law.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9462: State and Local Government

Students interested in general practice, and in education, environmental, and labor law will benefit from this course. In addition, students interested in local and state government employment, elected office, and local finance and taxation practice will find the class helpful. It surveys major issues of state and local government, emphasizing historical antecedents and current problems. Topics will vary as cutting‑edge issues emerge, but may include police and regulatory powers; structure, annexation, and boundary changes; home rule theory and practice; educational financing and organization, including charter schools; taxing and financing powers; governmental tort liability; intergovernmental conflicts; and preemption. Short written papers may be assigned, often with an emphasis on writing for a legislative audience.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9564: State and Local Tax/Public Financing

Surveys state and local government revenue sources and expenditure patterns. Examines government debt financing techniques and instruments, as well as the interrelationship of federal and state authority, including economic and political influences.

Recommended: Tax I and State & Local Government 

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9263: Structured Study Group Leader

Structured Study Groups focus on assisting students with the mastery of skills (e.g., outlining skills, study skills, and exam‑taking skills) within the context of their doctrinal classes. The Structured Study Group Leaders are responsible for leading study groups for one hour each week, and for preparing lesson plans, small group exercises, and a variety of teaching and learning tools with the goal of facilitating student learning in a collaborative setting. The Leaders are also encouraged to be available outside of the study group sessions to assist their students and to serve as mentors. In addition, the Leaders are required to attend classroom sessions focused on pedagogy that require significant reading, preparation of mock lessons, and other assignments designed to improve their teaching skills.

Enrollment is by invitation of the director of academic success upon advance application. The course is offered only on a pass/no pass basis. Students earn two credits per semester. Enrollment in the first semester is a prerequisite to enrollment in the second semester (except in special circumstances and with permission of the director of academic success). Students may serve as Structured Study Group Leaders for a maximum of two semesters.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9309: Tax I: Tax of Individuals

Considers federal income taxation law as set out in the Internal Revenue Code and its administrative and judicial interpretations. Emphasis is placed upon basic tax concepts and tax questions relating to the individual taxpayer.

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9521: Tax II: Tax of Business Entities

Examines the income tax law as it relates to corporations, partnerships, trusts, and estates.

Prerequisite: Tax I: Tax of Individuals 

Recommended: Corporations and Accounting for Lawyers

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9335: Theories of Conflict

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to important theoretical perspectives on our understanding of conflict and conflict response. Specifically, students explore the biological/ physiological, psychodynamic, social psychological, communication and sociological/political perspectives on conflict by reading and discussing major theoretical works within each perspective. Emphasis is on comparing and distinguishing key dimensions of these theories, such as the nature and sources of conflict, conflict escalation, conflict response, and the nature of the third party role. Classes follow an interactive format. Using case studies, exercises, and group discussion to draw upon personal experiences, including those involving race and social identity, the course explores the usefulness of each perspective to understanding the experience of conflict.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9151: Torts I

Focuses on civil actions for injury to person, property, or intangible interest on claims of intentional wrongs, negligence, or strict liability. Torts I is a vehicle to teach development of the common law.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Required Course

3 Credits


LAW 9252: Torts II

Extends the concepts learned in Torts I to specific modern torts. Emphasizes products liability actions and includes consideration of the action for defamation and invasion of privacy; and alternatives to the tort compensation system.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Prerequisite: Torts I

Every Year Course

3 Credits

LAW 9608: Trade Secret Law

This course provides an in-depth examination of trade secret law, including the scope of protection, the pre-requisites for protection, and the elements of a claim for trade secret misappropriation. In contrast to other IP courses, trade secret law is primarily based upon state law. Thus, students will learn how to read, interpret, and apply state law and how differences in the way states interpret and apply trade secret law may alter the outcome of a case.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9601: Trademark Law and Unfair Competition

This course begins with an examination of the common law of unfair competition, including business torts such as false advertising, trade disparagement, interference with contract and trademark infringement. The federal law governing trademark registration and infringement is explored in detail including an examination of subject matter, ownership, remedies, defenses, and trademark dilution.

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9321: Trial Advocacy

Provides training in trial advocacy skills for each stage of trial. Areas covered include: ethics, psychology of persuasion, opening statement, direct examination, exhibits, objections, cross‑examination, and closing argument. The teaching methods will include lecture, demonstration, discussion, simulation, instructor critique, and video critique. The final exam will be a trial.

Students may not receive credit for both Trial Advocacy and Litigation Practice.

Prerequisite: Evidence

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9317: Unincorporated Business Entities

Studies the formation and operation of unincorporated business, including sole proprietorship, partnerships, and limited liability companies. Topics include agency concepts and the rights and liabilities of those owning and managing unincorporated business forms.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Every Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9319: Water Law

A study of the ownership and use rules regarding water in the United States. This includes riparianism, prior appropriation doctrine, federal water law, ground water law, and some consideration of laws regarding water pollution.

Prerequisite: Property

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits


LAW 9310: Wills and Trusts

Studies property descent as governed by statute and court decisions relating to testate and intestate succession. Private express and charitable trusts are considered.

The content of this course is tested on the bar exam in a majority of states.

Prerequisite: Property

Every Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9563: Workers' Compensation

Surveys no‑fault compensation laws covering personal injuries in employment, including substance, procedure, and benefits under workers' compensation law. 

Every Other Year Course

3 Credits


LAW 9318: Wrongful Convictions

This course will examine the reasons behind wrongful convictions in the United States. There are many people in this nation convicted of, and serving time for, crimes they did not commit. Over 267 people have already been exonerated of crimes for which they were convicted. The course will include lecture, discussion and guest speakers about eyewitness identification, false confessions, snitches and informants, government misconduct, ineffective assistance of counsel, forensic science including DNA testing, post‑conviction remedies, the death penalty, media and investigative journalism, and racial bias. The course will also include in‑class exercises designed to help deal with these issues as a practitioner.

Every Other Year Course

2 Credits