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An Imprint of the Dispute Resolution Institute at Hamline University School of Law 

Established in 2009, DRI Press is the scholarship dissemination arm of the Dispute Resolution Institute bringing important conflict resolution work to a broad audience. In its inaugural year, DRI Press published Rethinking Negotiation Teaching: Innovations for Context and Culture and the Final Report of the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Diaspora Hearings.  Watch this site for additional publications.      

 

 


In May 2010, more than 50 of the world's leading negotiation scholars gathered in Beijing, China for the Rethinking Negotiation Teaching project’s third international conference designed to critically examine what is taught in contemporary negotiation courses and how we teach them, with special emphasis on how best to "translate" teaching methodology to succeed with diverse, global audiences. We chose China is the ideal venue to conclude our project’s inquiry, not only because of its own long history with negotiation, internal and external to the country, but because it is a nation with which, tensions or no tensions, every other nation must negotiate in the future. Yet, China has been almost unrepresented in the modern literature – at least, in the literature that is expressly about “negotiation.” Chinese scholars and practitioners also have yet to assert much influence in the global negotiation training market. Our hope was that the conference would serve as a springboard for the entry into this field, at a sophisticated level, of Chinese and other Asian scholars whose deep experience in many related subjects has yet to be fully felt in their implications for the field of negotiation. The contents of Assessing Our Students, Assessing Ourselves (Noam Ebner, James Coben, and Christopher Honeyman, April 2012), as well as the fourth and final volume in this teaching series – Educating Negotiators for a Connected World (Honeyman, Coben, and Lee, April 2013), suggest we may have succeeded in that particular goal.


 Vol4-Cover-WebEducating Negotiators for a CONNECTED WORLD
 Editors: Christopher Honeyman, James Coben, and Andrew Wei-Min Lee

Available at Amazon.com

To view and download individual chapters click HERE

 

 

DRI_vol3-front-cover-only1. Assessing Our Students, Assessing Ourselves: Volume 3 in the Rethinking Negotiation Teaching Series
 Editors: Noam Ebner, James Coben, and Christopher Honeyman
 
 Available at Amazon.com
 
To view and download individual chapters click HERE 
 

 

 Vol-2-small-1x1.5WEBVenturing Beyond the Classroom: Volume 2 in the Rethinking Negotiation Teaching Series
edited by Hamline Professor of Law James Coben, Hamline International Professor of ADR Law & Practice Giuseppe De Palo, and Christopher Honeyman

This volume presents a cross-section of the new thinking at the midpoint of the Rethinking Negotiation Teaching project.  It features 28 chapters authored by scholars reflecting on their participation in an October 2009, Hamline-sponsored international negotiation conference held in Istanbul, Turkey. The book is divided into five sections: The Big Picture; Beyond the Classroom; Redesigning Methods; Emotions and Relationships; and Wicked Problems. Chapters include: Instructors Heed the Who: Designing Negotiation Training with the Learner in Mind; Orientation and Disorientation: Two Approaches to Designing “Authentic” Negotiation Learning Activities; What Travels: Teaching Gender in Cross-Cultural Negotiation Classrooms; Emotions: A blind Spot in Negotiation Training?; Negotiating Wicked Problems: Five Stories; and many more.

Available at Amazon.com

To view and download individual chapters click HERE

 Vol-1-small-1x1.5WEBRethinking Negotiation Teaching: Innovations for Context and Culture 
edited by Hamline Professor of Law James Coben, Hamline International Professor of ADR Law & Practice Giuseppe De Palo, and Christopher Honeyman

 This collection, the first in a series of three volumes examining negotiation pedagogy, features 22 innovative chapters written by international scholars who gathered at a Hamline-sponsored conference in Rome, Italy in May 2008 to begin the multi-year Rethinking Negotiation Teaching project. The book is divided into five sections: The Big Picture; New Subjects for a New Age; Redesigning Methods; Templates and Tools; and Preparing for the "Innocents Abroad."  Chapters include: Finding Common Ground in the Soil of Culture, Negoti@ting via Email, Death of the Role Play, and Negotiating Learning Environments, and many more.

Available at Amazon.com.   

To view and download individual chapters, click HERE.

Versions:

Arabic (selected chapters) Mandarin (selected chapters)
 

TanPan-Web 谈判 Tán Pàn: TheChinese-English Journal on Negotiation is a joint project of the DisputeResolution Institute at Hamline University School of Law and the International Institute for Conflict Engagement and Resolution (IICER) in the Department of Law and Business at Hong Kong Shue Yan University.

The modern, multi–disciplinary, field of negotiation study has existed for some thirty years, and has produced a wealth of insights. To date, however, these have been disproportionately American in origin, outlook, and values, though the proportion of contributions from other countries is rising. China has, by contrast, been almost unrepresented in the modern literature -- at least, in the literature that is expressly about “negotiation.” Chinese scholars and practitioners also have yet to assert much influence in the global negotiation training market.

Everyone loses as a result. Few countries and cultures have China's long history with negotiation. We have reason to believe this includes a stunningly vast array of traditions and skills that are not yet widely recognized as having implications for negotiation. And externally, for other countries, negotiation with China is simply not optional. Now one of the world's two largest economies, China asserts itself in every sphere of modern life, and every other country must learn how to deal with it more productively. Internally, meanwhile, the thriving market economy means that almost every element of production, distribution, and daily life is a matter of negotiation. In short, negotiation both in and with China is pervasive. Yet up till now, there has been no organized venue for its reasoned consideration.

This bilingual Journal is intended to provide a home for a vigorous, interdisciplinary, and jointly practitioner/scholar intellectual life for the negotiation field in China. With the generous financial support of the JAMS Foundation, we launch the effort with the expectation as well as the hope that the field itself will change significantly once Chinese scholars begin to document, reformulate, and reassess some of what they have already studied under other headings. 

 


TRC_Report_cover_2A House with Two Rooms: Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Liberia Diaspora Project
written by The Advocates for Human Rights and published by DRI Press with editorial support by DRI Senior Fellow Ken Fox and Hamline Legal Writing Instructor Mary Dunnewold.  

Between June 9 and 14, 2008, Hamline University served as the sole U.S. host site for the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission's diaspora hearings. These U.S. hearings were part of the country of Liberia's national reconciliation process following more than two decades of civil war and internal conflict.  The U.S. hearings marked the first time in history that any truth commission had systematically sought to include its diaspora citizens in a process of national healing. A HOUSE WITH TWO ROOMS: FINAL REPORT OF THE TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSION OF LIBERIA DIASPORA REPORT comprehensively documents the background, findings and recommendations of the Liberian Diaspora Project. It is intended for use not only by the people and government of Liberia, but also by scholars, students and future national truth and reconciliation commissions and process designers, as well as by professionals in law, human rights, restorative justice, peace and reconciliation.

To read the final report of the Diaspora TRC Process online, click HERE
To order a copy of the final diaspora report from Amazon.com, click HERE

The following are additional resources related to the Liberian truth and reconciliation process:  

To read the final report on-line of the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission's national Liberian TRC process, click HERE
To view video and photo archives of the Liberian TRC hearings, click HERE  

For more information on the TRC diaspora process, go to the website for The Advocates for Human Rights by clicking here.